The status of coronavirus restrictions, state by state


Mannequin heads wear masks in the window of a small boutique advertising availability of masks, gloves, and other pandemic necessities amid the Coronavirus outbreak in Arlington, Virginia, on April 27, 2020.

Oliveri Douliery | AFP | Getty Images

Across the country, states have shut down businesses and ordered people to work from home if they can and stay indoors as much as possible to slow the spread of the coronavirus pandemic.

However, with cases beginning to level off, states are looking to jump-start economies hit hard by the virus. Millions of Americans who have been put out of work by lockdown efforts are also eager to get back in the work force. 

Governors have taken different tactics in developing plans to loosen stay-at-home orders in their states, each taking different paths in removing social-distancing restrictions. States in the Northeast, Midwest and West Coast have formed coalitions to usher in a regional recovery. Other states have faced criticism for already allowing nonessential businesses to resume in-person operations. Some governors have yet to release any sort of reopening plan.

Here is a rundown of how every state in the U.S. has responded to Covid-19 in terms of lifting restrictions on citizens and businesses. This list will be updated each day with new developments. 

States with stay-at-home mandates

Alabama Governor Kay Ivey

Office of the Alabama Governor

Alabama

  • Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey issued a statewide stay-at-home order that went into effect April 4. 
  • “We’ve got to take this order dead serious; otherwise, the fact is more people will end up dying,” Ivey said in a tweet sent April 3. 
  • The order limited religious services to fewer than 10 people, while worshipers stand at least six feet apart.
  • Ivey closed nonessential services, but gave a broad range of businesses that are considered essential, including gun retailers and bookstores. 
  • Alabama also ordered all schools to close for the remainder of the academic year. 

Reopening Plan:

  • Ivey issued a safer-at-home order on April 28 that will reopen parts of the state’s economy starting April 30.
  • While businesses with “high-risk” activities such as nightclubs, bowling alleys, barbershops and fitness centers are to remain closed.
  • Businesses allowed to reopen must maintain a distance of six feet between employees and avoid gatherings of 10 employees or more.
  • Restaurants still cannot have on-site eating, but can deliver food or have curbside pickup.
  • Beaches may reopen, but visitors must maintain six feet of separation from others not from their household.
  • Surgeries are allowed to move forward in hospitals and other medical facilities as long as they do not take resources away from treating Covid-19. 

Alaska

  • The stay-at-home order issued by Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy went into effect March 28. 
  • Nonessential businesses were closed. Services or organizations that violate the state order may have to cease operations and pay a $1,000 fine per violation.
  • Individuals who violate the stay-at-home order could face a prison term of up to a year and may have to pay a fine of up to $25,000.
  • Alaska closed schools through the rest of the school year.

Reopening Plan: 

  • Dunleavy announced his state’s reopening plan on April 22. 
  • Restaurants, retail, personal services and other public-facing businesses were allowed to begin reopening in a limited fashion starting April 24.
  • Reopening guidelines vary by sector, but measures include practicing social distancing and requiring employees to wear masks.
  • There are also guidelines for holding events like graduation ceremonies. Religious gatherings are also allowed to take place with a maximum of 20 people. 
  • A potential $1,000 fine is still in place for violation of any of the state’s Covid-19 mandates.

Arizona

  • The “Stay Home, Stay Healthy, Stay Connected” executive order issued by Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey went into effect March 31. It will be in effect until April 30, unless it is extended.
  • “Keeping Arizonans safe and healthy as we slow the spread of Covid-19 remains our top priority,” Ducey said in a statement.
  • Arizona also closed nonessential businesses and ordered those that remain open to implement social distancing guidelines when possible, including spacing employees at least six feet apart. 
  • Ducey also extended the closure of Arizona schools until the end of the year.

Reopening Plan: 

  • The current stay-at-home order remains in effect until April 30. 
  • Ducey has not released an extensive reopening plan.

California

  • California was the first state to issue a statewide stay-at-home order on March 19.
  • “Home isolation is not my preferred choice … but it is a necessary one …This is not a permanent state, this is a moment in time,” Gov. Gavin Newsom said at a press briefing announcing the order.
  • It shuttered nonessential businesses, including dine-in restaurants, bars and gyms.
  • Schools are expected to remain closed until the end of the school year, but may reopen as soon as July.

Reopening Plan:

  • California stay-at-home order has no set end date.
  • Along with Washington Gov. Jay Inslee and Oregon Gov. Kate Brown, Newsom announced a regional partnership to coordinate the reopening of the West Coast. Nevada and Colorado also joined.
  • Newsom provided six key indicators that will guide the state’s decision as it considers lifting restrictions.
  • He also announced a four-phase plan for reopening the state. Lower-risk businesses, such as retail and manufacturing, and public spaces will reopen during the second phase, which could be in a matter of weeks
  • Certain surgeries have been given the green light to move forward in the state.

Colorado

  • Colorado Gov. Jared Polis enacted an executive order mandating residents to stay at home.
  • Polis ordered the closure of nonessential businesses.
  • The order went into effect March 26 and its end date was extended from April 11 until April 26.
  • Polis also extended the closure of Colorado schools until April 30.

Reopening Plan:

  • Polis released a “Safer at Home” order on April 26 that outlines how certain businesses can safely reopen. It is in effect for 30 days.
  • Retail businesses were allowed to reopen for curbside delivery on April 27. The order also gave the green light for real estate home showings and voluntary and elective medical procedures, as long as safety protocols are followed.
  • Nonessential retailers can publicly open on May 1, and offer curbside pickup, drive-thru and delivery service. 
  • Non-critical commercial businesses can operate with 50% reduced in-person staffing as long as there are safety measures in place beginning May 4.
  • The order recommends that Colorado residents, particularly those who are senior citizens, should remain home as much as possible.

Delaware

  • All Delaware residents were ordered to shelter in place starting March 24 after Gov. John Carney declared a state of emergency
  • Carney also closed nonessential businesses, including casinos, movie theaters and fitness centers. However, religious organizations are exempt from the order.
  • Violation of Carney’s state of emergency declaration could constitute a criminal offense, according to the declaration.
  • Delaware schools are currently closed through the end of the academic year.

Reopening Plan: 

  • Delaware’s stay-at-home order is in place through May 15.
  • No extensive reopening plan has been released.
  • Delaware is part of a coalition with Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island that is focused on resuming working operations in these states. 

Florida

  • After taking measures such as mandating travelers from New York and New Jersey self-isolate for 14 days, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis issued a stay-at-home order that went into effect April 3.
  • DeSantis faced criticism for not issuing the order sooner. Many Florida counties had already implemented their own stay-at-home orders.
  • Nonessential businesses were shuttered, but there were religious exemptions.
  • The order said that “religious services conducted in churches, synagogues and houses of worship” are among the “essential activities” allowed to stay open.
  • Florida schools are directed to remain closed through the academic year.

Reopening:

  • DeSantis said Florida will be taking “baby steps” towards reopening, and that the process may happen at different paces in different regions. 
  • The state, excluding Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties, will begin phase one of its reopening plan on May 4, according to an announcement from DeSantis made April 29. 
  • He met with President Donald Trump on April 27 and they both praised the state’s Covid-19 response.
  • DeSantis also allowed certain beaches in the state to reopen on April 17.

Georgia

  • Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp signed a statewide shelter-in-place order that went into effect April 3 and extends through May 13. 
  • “All of us know that this fight is won at the community level,” Kemp said at the time the order was issued.
  • Kemp closed nonessential businesses such as fitness centers, bowling alleys and bars. 
  • Businesses that are not considered “critical infrastructure” are only allowed to engage in “minimum basic operations” such as letting employees work from home, according to the order.
  • Those who violate the policy could be found guilty of a misdemeanor, it said. 
  • Schools will remain closed until the end of the academic year.

Reopening Plan: 

Hawaii

  • All Hawaii residents were ordered to stay at home starting March 25.
  • Hawaii Gov. David Ige also closed nonessential businesses but allowed essential services such as grocery stores, medical cannabis dispensaries and pharmacies to remain open.
  • Those who violate the order could be found guilty of a misdemeanor and be fined at most $5,000 and face a year in prison.
  • Schools in Hawaii will remain closed through the end of the year. 

Reopening Plan: 

  • Hawaii has not yet released a reopening plan.

Idaho

  • Idaho’s stay-at-home order went into effect March 25. The order also closed the state’s nonessential businesses. 
  • “Idaho is now in a new stage with confirmed community transmission now occurring in Idaho’s most densely populated areas,” Gov. Brad Little said at a press briefing announcing the order.
  • Little also signed an “extreme emergency declaration” that he said would help the state increase its health-care capacity. 
  • Violation of the policy could result in being convicted of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine, imprisonment or both, according to the order.
  • The state’s schools are closed through the end of the academic year.

Reopening Plan: 

  • Idaho’s stay-at-home order goes through April 30.
  • Little has not yet released a reopening plan.

Illinois

  • Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker’s stay-at-home order went into effect March 21. Originally slated to end April 7, the order was extended until April 30.
  • Pritzker closed nonessential businesses, but exempted organizations that provide charitable and social services.
  • Enforcement of orders of eviction for residential premises were ceased for the duration of Pritzker’s disaster proclamation. 
  • The state extended school closures through the end of the academic year.

Reopening Plan: 

  • Pritzker announced that a modified stay-at-home order would extend through the end of May.
  • However, starting May 1, some restrictions will be lifted.
  • Nonessential retailers can reopen to fulfill telephone and online orders through pickup outside stores and delivery. Certain parks may reopen.
  • Beginning May 1, individuals will be required to wear a face covering when in a public place where they cannot keep a six-foot distance from others. Face coverings are required in indoor public spaces such as stores.

Indiana

  • Indiana’s stay-at-home order was issued March 24.
  • “Stay at home unless you’re going out on an essential errand or essential work or essential business,” Gov. Eric Holcomb said at a press briefing announcing the first order.
  • Nonessential businesses were required to cease all activities aside from “minimum basic operations” and have employees work from home if possible. 
  • Indiana schools will remain closed through the end of the academic year. 

Reopening Plan: 

  • Indiana is part of a Midwest coalition that includes Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Illinois and Kentucky that is working on a plan to reopen the region’s economy. 
  • The state has not yet released an extensive reopening plan.

Kansas

  • The state’s stay-at-home order from Gov. Laura Kelly went into effect March 30.  It closed nonessential businesses.
  • Religious institutions were originally exempted from a rule that public gatherings could include no more than 10 people, but Kelly revised guidance April 7 to ensure that places of worship had to comply with this policy.
  • “As Holy Week gets underway – and with Kansas rapidly approaching its projected ‘peak’ infection rate in the coming weeks – the risk for a spike in Covid-19 cases through church gatherings is especially dangerous,” Kelly said in a statement. “This was a difficult decision, and not one I was hoping to have to make.”
  • Kansas schools will remain closed until the end of the academic year. 

Reopening Plan: 

  • Kansas’ reopening plan is set to be announced this week, according to Kelly. 

Louisiana

  • Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards enacted a stay-at-home order that went into effect March 23.
  • The state closed also closed nonessential businesses.
  • Individuals are still allowed to attend religious services under the order.
  • Louisiana’s school closures will continue through the academic year.

Reopening Plan: 

  • Edwards extended the state’s stay-at-home order through May 15.
  • The extended order included key changes that will be enacted May 1.
  • Restaurants will be allowed to open their outside areas for patrons to eat in without table service.
  • All employees of a business who have contact with the public will be required to wear masks.
  • While malls will remain closed, stores can open for curbside delivery.

Maine

  • Maine Gov. Janet Mills’ “Stay Healthy at Home” mandate went into effect April 2. 
  • “We are in the midst of one of the greatest public health crises this world has seen in more than a century,” Mills said in a statement. “This virus will continue to sicken people across our state; our cases will only grow, and more people will die.”
  • The state closed nonessential businesses and instituted specific limits on the number of customers allowed inside essential stores based on the size of the store. 
  • Those who violate the mandate could be subject to up to six months in jail and a $1,000 fine.
  • Maine schools were recommended to remain closed through the end of the academic year.

Reopening Plan: 

  • Mills said April 14 that she is in touch with New Hampshire and Vermont on formulating a reopening plan.

Maryland

  • Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan issued a stay-at-home order that went into effect March 30. The state previously closed nonessential businesses on March 23.
  • “We are no longer asking or suggesting that Marylanders stay home; we are directing them to do so,” Hogan said at a press conference.
  • Those who violate the order could be charged with a misdemeanor and face up to a year in prison and a $5,000 fine.
  • Maryland schools will remain closed through May 15.

Reopening Plan: 

  • Hogan released a three-stage recovery plan on April 24. 
  • The plan’s first stage is not yet in effect, as it involves lifting the state’s stay-at-home order.
  • It also includes the reopening of certain small businesses and personal services and allow for recreational boating, fishing, golf, tennis, hiking and hunting.
  • Stage Two will involve raising the cap on social gatherings and resuming normal public transit schedules, among other measures.
  • The final stage will include instituting higher-risk activities, such as reopening bars and restaurants.

Massachusetts

  • Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker ordered all nonessential businesses to close and directed the Department of Health to issue a stay-at-home advisory. The order went into effect March 24.
  • Businesses and organizations that do not provide “Covid-19 essential services” had to shut down in-person operations.
  • “We will always allow all grocery stores, pharmacies and other types of businesses that provide essential goods and services to Massachusetts residents to continue to operate,” Baker said.
  • Massachusetts schools will stay closed through the end of the school year.

Reopening Plan: 

  • Massachusetts joined Delaware, New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island in forming a coalition that is focused on resuming working operations in these states. 
  • The state formed a Reopening Advisory Board that will provide a plan to Baker by May 18.

Michigan

  • Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer issued a “Stay Home, Stay Safe” order that went into effect March 24.
  • “If we all stay at home, except for critical work and needs, we can mitigate the spread of Covid-19,” Whitmer said in a tweet announcing the order.
  • The order also prohibited in-person work that “is not necessary to sustain or protect life,” and contained certain exemptions for religious institutions. 
  • Michigan’s schools will remain closed until the end of the academic year.

Reopening Plan: 

  • In addition to being part of the Midwest recovery coalition, Michigan lifted some restrictions when Whitmer extended the state’s stay-at-home order through May 15. 
  • Landscapers, lawn-service companies and nurseries were allowed to return to work, subject to strict social distancing.
  • Nonessential retailers can reopen for curbside pickup and for delivery.
  • The order also allows for golfing and motorized boating.
  • People are required to wear face coverings in enclosed public spaces. 
  • Michigan has experienced protests against Whitmer’s policies. 

Minnesota

  • Minnesota’s stay-at-home order went into effect March 27.
  • “While the virus will still be here when this order ends, this action will slow the spread of Covid-19 and give Minnesota time to ready for battle,” Gov. Tim Walz said in a statement.
  • A person who violates Walz’s executive order could be found guilty of a misdemeanor and face a fine of up to $1,000 and imprisonment for no more than 90 days. 
  • Minnesota schools will use distance learning through the end of the academic year. 

Reopening Plan: 

Mississippi

  • Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves enacted a stay-at-home order for the state that went into effect April 3 and will remain so until April 30.
  • Reeves also closed all nonessential businesses, but exempted religious entities as long they adhere to guidelines from the state and Centers for Disease Control and Protection. 
  • All schools in Mississippi are currently closed through the end of the academic year.

Reopening Plan: 

  • Reeves issued a new “safer-at-home” order on April 27 that goes through May 11.
  • Under the new order, businesses such as gyms, bars, clubs and tattoo parlors will remain closed, but retailers can offer delivery and curbside pickup services.

Missouri

  • Missouri’s stay-at-home order went into effect April 6.
  • “I have no greater responsibility than to protect the health, well-being, and safety of all Missourians,” Gov. Mike Parson said in a statement.
  • The order stated that businesses that do not employ workers in essential functions must adhere to social distancing requirements by maintaining six feet of space between individuals and limiting gatherings to less than 10 people. 
  • School districts in Missouri are closed through the end of the academic year.

Reopening Plan: 

  • The first phase of Parson’s “Show Me Strong Recovery” plan will begin May 4.
  • During phase one of the plan, residents can resume economic and social activities as long as they adhere to social distancing requirements, including maintaining distances of six feet apart.
  • All businesses can be open under the plan, provided that they follow social distancing guidelines.

Montana

  • Montana Gov. Steve Bullock implemented a stay-at-home directive that went into effect March 28. 
  • “I have determined that to protect public health and human safety, it is essential, to the maximum extent possible, individuals stay at home or at their place of residence,” Bullock said.
  • Bullock ordered all nonessential businesses cease in-person operations.
  • Starting May 7, Montana schools may return to in-classroom teaching at the discretion of the local school boards.

Reopening Plan: 

  • Bullock released a plan for Montana’s reopening on April 22. 
  • Retail businesses can be operational as long as they can adhere to social distancing practices.
  • Places of worship are also allowed to resume services.
  • Restaurants, bars, breweries and distilleries can provide in-establishment services starting May 4.

Nevada

  • Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak mandated that residents should remain in their homes unless leaving for essential services on March 31.
  • The state also closed nonessential businesses, including casinos. 
  • Places of worship were prohibited from holding in-person services with 10 or more people, according to a tweet he sent April 8. 
  • Nevada schools will remain closed through the end of the academic year.

Reopening Plan: 

  • Nevada is a part of the Western state coalition working on a regional recovery plan.
  • Sisolak announced a set of criteria that the state will have to meet in order to reopen. 
  • This criteria includes seeing a downward trend in Covid-19 cases and hospitalizations.
  • “The reopening of our economy is highly dependent upon expanded testing and tracing capacity,” Sisolak said in a statement.

New Hampshire

  • New Hampshire’s stay-at-home order went into effect March 27. Gov. Chris Sununu also ordered nonessential businesses to close.
  • “We can’t stress this enough – you should stay at your house unless absolutely necessary,” Sununu said in a statement on Twitter. “Of course, we won’t prevent you from leaving your home to go for a walk, or when heading to the store for groceries, or going to an essential job.”
  • Religious institutions are still able to have gatherings that are less than 10 people. 
  • Schools in the state will remain closed through the end of the academic year.

Reopening Plan: 

  • Sununu extended New Hampshire’s state of emergency on April 22. It is now in place until May 15.
  • The state has not yet released a reopening plan.

New Jersey

  • New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy’s executive order mandated that residents remain in their homes and went into effect March 21.
  • Murphy also closed nonessential businesses.
  • “If you are not needed as part of our response efforts, stay home and practice social distancing,” Murphy said.
  • The state’s schools will remain closed until further notice.

Reopening Plan: 

  • New Jersey is part of the Eastern coalition of states working on an economic recovery plan.
  • Murphy announced a reopening plan on April 27 called “The Road Back: Restoring Economic Health Through Public Health.”
  • The plan includes principles for measuring progress towards reopening the state, including expanding testing capacity and demonstrating reductions in new Covid-19 cases.
  • The state’s stay-at-home order will remain in effect until further notice.
  • New Jersey will reopen state parks and golf courses on May 2.

New Mexico

  • New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham said residents should remain in their homes except for outings absolutely necessary for health, safety and welfare. The restrictions went into effect March 24.
  • “The only way for us to stop the spread of this virus is for New Mexicans to stop interacting with each other,” Lujan Grisham said in a statement.
  • New Mexico Secretary of Health Kathy Kunkel also issued an order closing all nonessential businesses.
  • Schools will remain closed through the academic year.

Reopening Plan: 

  • New Mexico has not yet released a reopening plan.

New York

  • New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo ordered all nonessential businesses to keep 100% of their workforce at home starting March 22.
  • “When I talk about the most drastic action we can take, this is the most drastic action we can take,” Cuomo said at a press conference.
  • New York also increased the maximum fine for violations of the state’s social distancing protocol from $500 to $1,000. The measure was taken to help address the lack of adherence to social distancing protocols.
  • Schools in the state will remain closed through May 15. However, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced the city’s schools will remain closed through the end of the academic year.
  • In response, Cuomo said that the announcement was de Blasio’s “opinion” and that there was not yet an official decision on school closings.
  • New York has the most coronavirus cases of any state.

Reopening Plan: 

  • Cuomo on April 28 outlined a 12-step plan to reopen parts of the state.
  • The plan would require establishing regional isolation facilities to monitor the outbreak and hiring contact tracers to track the spread of the virus. It also centers on keeping hospitals from growing overwhelmed.
  • Cuomo said that businesses that do reopen will need to guarantee that their employees and customers maintain adequate social distancing.
  • They will also have to frequently test employees, maintain strict cleaning standards and follow continuous tracing and reporting protocols, among other precautions.

North Carolina

  • North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper’s stay-at-home order went into effect March 30. 
  • “It’s what we have to do to save lives,” Cooper said.
  • Cooper also ordered nonessential businesses to close, but religious entities are allowed to remain open under certain limitations.
  • Violation of the state order could result in being convicted of a misdemeanor.
  • North Carolina schools are closed through the end of the school year.

Reopening Plan:

  • Cooper extended the state’s stay-at-home order through May 8.
  • He also revealed a three-phase plan that will allow North Carolina to reopen after May 8.
  • The state will need to meet specific criteria related to testing capacity and slowing the virus’ spread in order for restrictions to be lifted. 
  • Some businesses would be allowed to reopen in the first phase of the plan.

Ohio

  • Ohio’s stay-at-home order became effective March 23. The mandate was enacted by Amy Acton, director of the Ohio Department of Health, rather than Gov. Mike DeWine.
  • The order also closed all nonessential businesses.
  • “We haven’t faced an enemy like we are facing today in 102 years – we are at war,” DeWine said in a statement. “In the time of war, we must make sacrifices.”
  • Ohio schools have been ordered to remain closed through the school year.

Reopening Plan:

  • DeWine has not released a reopening plan for Ohio.

Oregon

  • Oregon Gov. Kate Brown issued a stay-at-home order that went into immediate effect on March 23. The order remains in effect until terminated by Brown
  • The order also closed all nonessential businesses.
  • Brown announced April 8 that all schools in the state will remain closed through the end of the academic year.

Reopening Plan:

  • Oregon is part of the Western state coalition working on a regional recovery plan.
  • Brown introduced criteria for reopening Oregon, including ramping up testing and establishing a quarantine and isolation program for new cases.
  • She also gave the green light for non-urgent medical procedures to resume on May 1.

Pennsylvania

  • After issuing stay-at-home orders for select counties, Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf mandated all of the state’s residents to remain at home starting March 23.
  • Originally slated to end April 6, the order was extended through April 30. 
  • Wolf also ordered the closure of businesses that were not “life-sustaining.” 
  • Pennsylvania schools will remain closed through the end of the academic year.

Reopening Plan:

  • Pennsylvania is part of the Eastern state coalition collaborating on an economic recovery plan.
  • Wolf offered a plan for reopening the state with a targeted start date of May 8. The administration will categorize reopening into three phases: red, yellow and green.
  • Regions and counties are likely to move into different phases at different times.
  • The construction industry can resume work in the state on May 1, and limited recreational activities will be allowed starting that day as well.

Rhode Island

  • Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo ordered the state’s residents to remain at home on March 28. She also mandated that “all non-critical retail businesses” must cease in-person operations.
  • Raimondo also ordered all travelers to Rhode Island from New York state to self-quarantine for 14 days, which caused controversy.
  • “I don’t think the order was called for,” New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said regarding the order. “I don’t believe it was legal. I don’t believe it was neighborly … I understand the point, but I think there were different ways of doing it.”
  • Rhode Island school are closed through the rest of the academic year.

Reopening plan:

South Carolina

  • South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster issued an executive order mandating that residents must stay at home except for essential reasons. It went into effect April 7. 
  • McMaster also ordered the closure of nonessential businesses such as night clubs, fitness centers and clothing retailers.
  • “All residents and visitors of the State of South Carolina are required to limit social interaction, practice ‘social distancing’ in accordance with CDC guidance, and take every possible precaution to avoid potential exposure to, and to slow the spread of, Covid-19,” the order stated.
  • The state’s schools are to remain closed through the end of the school year.

Reopening plan:

  • McMaster declared a new state of emergency for South Carolina on April 27, so the state could continue responding to Covid-19. The order lasts for 15 days. 
  • He previously announced an economic revival plan called “accelerateSC” on April 20. 
  • Certain retail stores, including clothing, furniture and jewelry shops were allowed to reopen on April 20 as long as they follow social distancing requirements, and operate at 20% occupancy or five customers per 1,000 square feet, whichever is less.
  • Beaches were allowed to reopen April 21.

Tennessee

  • Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee issued an executive order telling residents to stay at home. He also mandated the closure of nonessential businesses for public use.
  • The order went into effect March 31.
  • People are still allowed to leave their home to attend religious services.
  • Lee recommended that schools in Tennessee remain closed through the end of the academic year. 

Reopening Plan:

  • Lee has tailored the state’s reopening plan to specific business sectors
  • Restaurants were able to reopen April 27 at 50% occupancy.
  • Tennessee retailers were allowed to reopen on April 29 at half their occupancy. 
  • The state recommended that employees in both industries wear face coverings and that business owners follow federal guidelines for workplace sanitation standards related to the pandemic.
  • Gyms can open May 1 under state recommendations that include certain restrictions such as keeping pools, showers and locker rooms closed. 

Vermont

  • Vermont’s stay-at-home order went into effect March 25.
  • “I need all Vermonters to understand that the more quickly and closely we follow these stay-at-home measures, the faster and safer we can get through this and get our daily lives, and our economy, moving again,” Gov. Phil Scott said in a statement.
  • The order included the closure of in-person operations for all nonessential businesses.
  • Schools in Vermont are closed through the end of the academic year.

Reopening Plan:

  • The state’s stay-at-home order is still in effect, but has been modified to allow some to return to work.
  • Scott is taking “a measured, phased approach” to reopening the economy.
  • Certain businesses were allowed to resume operations under certain conditions starting April 27. 
  • Outdoor businesses, construction operations and recreation maintenance work are allowed to operate with a maximum of five total workers per location.
  • Manufacturing and distribution operations, as well interior construction on uninhabited structures, can occur with five employees in one location who maintain distances of six feet apart.
  • Outdoor retail space can allow in-person shopping with a maximum of 10 total people. 
  • Farmers markets are allowed to open May 1 as long as they prevent congregating.

Virginia

  • Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam issued a stay-at-home order, effective March 30.
  • The order extends until June 10, making it one of the longest statewide mandates implemented so far.
  • “Don’t go to the store for just one thing,” Northam said at a press briefing. “Wait until you have a list. If you’re traveling from out of state, stay in quarantine for 14 days. Every age group needs to act responsibly and stay home.”
  • Northam also closed nonessential businesses.
  • Virginia’s schools are closed through the end of the academic year.

Reopening Plan:

  • Northam released the “Forward Virginia” plan for easing public health restrictions in the state on April 24.
  • The plan has criteria that includes increasing personal protective equipment for health workers and slowing the number of new cases, in order for the state to move to phase one of the reopening plan.
  • During the first phase, certain businesses will be allowed to reopen with some restrictions and face coverings will be recommended to be worn in public.

Washington

  • Washington Gov. Jay Inslee issued a stay-at-home proclamation on March 23 telling residents to “stay home, stay healthy.” 
  • “The less time we spend in public, the more lives we will save,” Inslee said in a statement.
  • The statewide order also included the closure of nonessential businesses.
  • Violation of Inslee’s stay-at-home order could be classified as a gross misdemeanor and result in a $5,000 fine and up to 364 days in jail, according to the order.
  • Schools remain closed in Washington through the end of the academic year.

Reopening Plan:

  • Washington is part of the Western States Pact working to establish a regional recovery. 
  • Inslee announced April 24 that he will be lifting some restrictions on outdoor recreation.
  • Starting May 5, people will be allowed to fish and hunt, as well as visit state parks and state public lands managed by the Department of Natural Resources. 
  • Public gatherings, events, team sports and camping will not be resuming at that time. 
  • Inslee has not released an extensive plan regarding the reopening of businesses.

West Virginia

  • West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice implemented a stay-at-home order for the entire state that went into effect March 24.
  • “This order asks West Virginians to stay at home and limit movements outside beyond essential needs,” Justice said in a tweet.
  • Nonessential businesses were told to temporarily cease operations, but religious entities were exempted as long as congregants maintain distances of six feet apart.
  • The state’s schools will remain closed through the academic year.

Reopening Plan: 

  • Justice released a six-week reopening plan called “West Virginia Strong – The Comeback” on April 27.
  • The first week begins April 30 and involves resuming elective medical operations and outpatient health care.
  • During the second week, any small business with fewer than 10 employees may resume operations, including hair salons, nail salons, barbershops and pet grooming.
  • Guidance will be made available addressing specific business sectors.
  • In weeks three to six, additional businesses will be allowed to reopen, including office/government buildings, specialty retail stores and casinos. 

Wisconsin

  • Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers directed the state’s Department of Health Services to issue a “Safer at Home” order prohibiting nonessential travel that was effective March 24.
  • “Issuing a Safer at Home order isn’t something I thought we’d have to do and it’s not something I take lightly, but here’s the bottom line: folks need to start taking this seriously,” Evers said in a statement.
  • Nonessential businesses were shuttered, but grocery stores, gas stations and banks as well as other essential businesses were allowed to remain open.
  • Wisconsin held its primary election during the stay-at-home order, causing controversy. Former Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders referred to the situation as “dangerous.”
  • Violation of the order is punishable by up to 30 days imprisonment, or up to a $250 fine.
  • The state’s schools will have distance learning until the end of the academic year. 

Reopening Plan: 

  • Evers extended the state’s stay-at-home order through May 26. 
  • The order included some modifications. Nonessential businesses and public libraries were allowed to serve customers via curbside pickup and delivery.
  • The state lifted further restrictions on some businesses starting April 29. Groomers, small engine repair shops upholstery businesses are now allowed to do curbside drop-off of goods and animals.
  • Golf courses can also open to the public. 
  • Starting May 1, several state parks and forests can also reopen under conditions that minimize overcrowding. 

Washington, DC

  • Washington, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser issued a stay-at-home order for the nation’s capital that went into effect April 1. 
  • Residents are allowed to leave their homes to perform an essential job and for essential activities such as obtaining food or medicine.
  • Those found guilty of violating the order, which is considered a misdemeanor, could be subject to a fine of up to $5,000 and face imprisonment of no more than 90 days.
  • The city also ordered nonessential businesses such as barber shops, fitness centers and libraries to close.
  • “We have virtually shut down economic activity in our city in an effort to contain the spread of the virus,” Bowser said at a press briefing regarding the order.
  • Schools in Washington, D.C. will be closed through the end of the academic year.

Reopening Plan:

States with stay-at-home recommendations

Gov. Ned Lamont speaks at a press conference at the UConn School of Business Graduate Learning Center in Hartford, Connecticut on Tuesday, Jan. 13, 2020.

Brad Horrigan | Hartford Courant | Getty Images

Connecticut

  • Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont’s executive order closed nonessential businesses on March 23.
  • Lamont also gave strong recommendations for residents to remain safe at home when he issued the order.
  • “At this critical time it is essential that everyone just stay home so we can contain the spread of this virus while keeping essential services running,” Lamont said in a statement.
  • Connecticut schools are closed through at least May 20.

Reopening Plan:

  • Connecticut is part of the Northeastern coalition working on an economic recovery for the region.
  • Lamont announced the leaders of the Reopen Connecticut Advisory Board on April 23. Members of the board come from the health, business and education sectors.
  • An extensive reopening plan for Connecticut has not been released.

Kentucky

  • Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear’s “Healthy at Home” order closed nonessential businesses, but only encouraged residents to remain at home.
  • The order was issued March 25 and shuttered all businesses not considered “life-sustaining.”
  • Beshear recommended schools stay closed through the end of the academic year.

Reopening Plan:

  • Beshear’s four-phase reopening plan for the health industry was enacted April 27. The first phase includes allowing non-urgent medical and dental procedures to resume under certain conditions.
  • He also released certain public health criteria the state will have to meet before reopening parts of the economy, including having 14 days where coronavirus cases are decreasing. 
  • Once these criteria are met, the state’s economy will reopen under Beshear’s “Healthy at Work” initiative. 

Texas

  • Texas Gov. Greg Abbott issued an executive order stating that residents should minimize social gatherings and in-person contact whenever necessary except when providing or obtaining essential services. The order went into effect April 2. 
  • However, Abbott declined to refer to the new measure as a stay-at-home order when announcing it at a press conference. “This is not a stay-at-home strategy,” he said. “This is a standard that is based on essential services and essential activities.”
  • The order also stated that people should not visit gyms, massage establishments, tattoo studios, piercing studios or cosmetology salons.
  • Failure to comply with any executive order issued during the COVD-19 pandemic “is an offense punishable by a fine not to exceed $1,000, confinement in jail for a term not to exceed 180 days, or both fine and confinement,” according to the order.
  • Texas schools are closed through the end of the academic year.

Reopening Plan:

  • Certain businesses in Texas will be allowed to reopen on May 1 under an executive order issued by Abbott on April 28.
  • These measures are part of the first phase of Abbott’s reopening plan.
  • In-store retail services, dine-in restaurant services, movie theaters, shopping malls, museums and libraries will be able to open with 25% occupancy under certain conditions.
  • Golf course operations are also allowed to resume.

Utah

  • Utah Gov. Gary Herbert issued a stay-at-home directive on March 27 urging individuals to stay at home as much as possible.
  • “These directives are not to be confused with a shelter-in-place order,” the directive said.
  • Restaurants were also ordered to close dining services in their establishments.
  • Schools in Utah will remain closed through the end of the academic year.

Reopening Plan:

  • Herbert released an updated version of his “Utah Leads Together” plan on April 17, which breaks down the state’s recovery in multiple phases based on risk assessment.
  • Starting May 1, restaurants in the state can have customers dine in again as long as they use “extreme precautions,” according to a tweet sent by Herbert.

States with no stay-at-home orders

Governor Asa Hutchinson (R-AK)

William B. Plowman | NBCUniversal

Arkansas

  • Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson did not issue a stay-at-home order for Arkansas.
  • “The continued spread of Covid-19 throughout the nation does not give me confidence that our educators, parents, and, most importantly, our students would be safe if schools were to resume on-site instruction in April,” Hutchinson said in a statement
  • Hutchinson did place restrictions on businesses including requiring them to limit the number of customers in the store so that they can maintain distances of six feet apart. Restaurants were only able to do takeout or delivery under the order.
  • He also mandated the closure of personal services like barbershops and nail salons, as well as gyms.
  • Schools are closed through the end of the academic year. 

Reopening Plan:

  • Arkansas has established a set of dates for when restrictions will be lifted on businesses.
  • Restaurants had their restrictions dropped on April 29.
  • Starting April 30, gyms and indoor recreational facilities can resume operations.
  • Beauty salons and barbershops will have their restrictions lifted on May 1.
  • State parks will be able to begin opening certain facilities starting May 1 as well.

Iowa

  • While Iowa has closed nonessential businesses, the state has not issued a stay-at-home order.
  • Gov. Kim Reynolds has enacted multiple orders closing various nonessential businesses. She issued a proclamation that went into effect April 7 that closed malls, vaping stores, museums and other entities.
  • Reynolds ordered Iowa schools to be closed through the end of the academic year.

Reopening Plan:

  • Certain restrictions in select counties in Iowa will begin to be lifted starting May 1.
  • Restaurants will be able to offer dine-in service under specific guidance, including operating at 50% capacity.
  • Fitness centers, malls and libraries can also reopen at 50% capacity.
  • Bars, theaters, pools and other facilities will continue to remain closed.

Nebraska

  • Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts has not yet issued a stay-at-home order or closed nonessential businesses in the state.
  • “As we look at the data, we are seeing that we are different from other states,” Ricketts said at a press briefing April 6.
  • He urged residents to “stay home whenever possible, stay healthy and stay connected” in a statement.
  • Restaurants were ordered to cease dine-in operations
  • The state’s schools are to remain closed through May 31. 

Reopening Plan: 

  • Ricketts met with restaurant and dental professionals on April 28 to discuss reopening guidelines.
  • Restaurants in Nebraska can resume dine-in service on May 4 at 50% capacity.
  • Dental facilities can also resume normal operations as long as they have enough personal protective equipment. 

North Dakota

  • North Dakota Gov. Doug Burgum has not enacted a statewide stay-at-home order.
  • Certain businesses, including barber shops and fitness centers, are closed. But Burgum has not yet mandated a statewide closure of nonessential businesses.
  • “This isn’t as much about what government says, it’s more about what individuals do,” Burgum said at a press conference. 
  • North Dakota schools are closed until further notice.

Reopening Plan:

  • Closed businesses in North Dakota are set to reopen May 1.
  • The state recommends that these businesses limit the number of people in their facilities and encourage employees to wear face coverings. 

Oklahoma

  • While Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt ordered the closure of nonessential businesses for 30 days on April 1, he has yet to issue a stay-at-home mandate. 
  • Stitt also ordered all travelers to Oklahoma from New York, Connecticut, New Jersey, Washington, California and Louisiana to quarantine for 14 days.
  • The state’s schools will remain closed through the academic year.

Reopening Plan:

  • Stitt released a plan for Oklahoma’s reopening on April 24.
  • Personal care businesses such as hair salons and barbershops were allowed to reopen on April 24, as well as state parks.
  • Dining facilities, gyms, theaters and places of worship can reopen May 1, as long as they adhere to certain health guidelines.
  • Bars are to remain closed until further guidance is given.

South Dakota

  • South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem has not yet issued a stay-at-home order or mandated the closure of the state’s nonessential businesses.
  • Noem did issue an executive order stating that “an enclosed retail business that promotes public gatherings” should suspend or modify business practices that involve 10 or more people to be in an enclosed space where a separation of six feet is not possible among individuals. 
  • South Dakota schools are likely to remain closed for the rest of the year, according to Noem. 

Reopening Plan:

  • South Dakota has not released a reopening plan.

Wyoming

  • Wyoming Gov. Mark Gordon has not yet issued a stay-at-home order for the state or closed all nonessential businesses.
  • However, Gordon did issue three separate orders that closed public spaces including schools, prohibited gatherings of 10 or more people in a single room or confined space and shuttered bars, restaurants, coffee shops and personal services. He limited food services to delivery and pickup.
  • Gordon has also stated that “people need to stay home whenever possible to prevent or slow the spread of the virus.”
  • Wyoming schools will remain closed through May 15.

Reopening Plan:

  • Gordon announced that barbershops, hair salons and other personal care services can reopen May 1 under specific operating conditions that prevent the spread of Covid-19.
  • He extended the ban on public gatherings of more than 10 people through May 15.



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